VitAox Ultra, an innovative multivitamin and antioxidant complex with natural ingredients

VitAox Ultra is an advanced combination of natural ingredients and plant extracts which contains antioxidants, carotenoids and vitamin D formulated by dermatologists and nutritionists

Polypodium Leucotomos

This ingredient comes from the extract of the fern Polypodium leucotomos. Its affinity with the skin is very high and protects its antioxidant systems.

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Polypodium leucotomos (PL) or Calaguala is a type of fern native to the tropical and subtropical regions of America.

The extract of Polypodium leucotomos is polyphenol-rich, which confer antioxidant properties.

Most research about Polypodium leucotomos has been focused on its photoprotective qualities after oral ingestion. Several of these studies have shown that oral intake of Polypodium leucotomos is efficient protecting skin against damage caused by ultraviolet radiation.

Evidence suggests that PL can reduce redness, rate by which skin gets sunburned after sun exposure, and some other markers of sun damage in the skin.

In humans, single doses of Polypodium Leucotomos extract does not only have an antioxidant effect and it also inhibits lipid peroxidation in cell membranes but also reduces skin inflammation after UV exposure. A particularly important effect of Polypodium Leucotomos after its intake is the induction and activation of a gene (Gene p53), associated with a faster removal of highly mutagenic photoproducts of DNA.

In this context it has also proved it prevents DNA oxidative damage by reducing the UV induced mutagenesis.

There is enough clinical evidence to recommend oral intake of Polypodium Leucotomos as a photoprotective agent and for some skin affections.

See study

Berman B, Ellis C, Elmets C. Polypodium Leucotomos–An Overview of Basic Investigative Findings. J Drugs Dermatol. 2016 Feb;15(2):224-8.

Polypodium Leucotomos (PL) or Calaguala is a type of fern native to the tropical and subtropical regions of America.

The extract of Polypodium Leucotomos is polyphenol-rich, which confer antioxidant properties.

Most research about Polypodium Leucotomos has been focused on its photoprotective qualities after oral ingestion. Several of these studies have shown that oral intake of Polypodium Leucotomos is efficient protecting skin against damage caused by ultraviolet radiation.

Evidence suggests that PL can reduce redness, rate by which skin gets sunburned after sun exposure, and some other markers of sun damage in the skin.

In humans, single doses of Polypodium Leucotomos extract does not only have an antioxidant effect and it also inhibits lipid peroxidation in cell membranes but also reduces skin inflammation after UV exposure. A particularly important effect of Polypodium Leucotomos after its intake is the induction and activation of a gene (Gene p53), associated with a faster removal of highly mutagenic photoproducts of DNA.

In this context it has also proved it prevents DNA oxidative damage by reducing the UV induced mutagenesis.

There is enough clinical evidence to recommend oral intake of Polypodium Leucotomos as a photoprotective agent and for some skin affections.

See study

Berman B, Ellis C, Elmets C. Polypodium Leucotomos–An Overview of Basic Investigative Findings. J Drugs Dermatol. 2016 Feb;15(2):224-8.

Green tea

It is well-known for its antioxidant contribution thanks to its high content in polyphenols.

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Green tea is one of the most popular drinks all over the world. Thousands of millions of people drink tea and numerous studies show that green tea is highly beneficial for our health. There are three main types of tea: green, black and oolong. All three types come from the leaves of the same plant, called Camellia sinesis. The difference is how the leaves are processed. Green tea is based on unfermented leaves, oolong tea comes from partially fermented leaves and black tea comes from the totally fermented ones.

Green tea contains several bioactive compounds, such as caffeine, other alkaloids, polyphenols and vitamin K. Most of its healthy properties are due to its polyphenol content. Green tea polyphenols include flavonoids and catechins, which can reduce the formation of free radicals and some other damaging structures in the body to protect cells and molecules.

Multiple studies have proved the benefits of green tea polyphenols as photoprotection against UV-induced damage. Since polyphenols can be stored in the skin, drinking green tea regularly or taking a green tea supplements could help our daily photoprotection.

The photoprotective effect of green tea can help with the reduction of erythema caused by ultraviolet radiation. Studies on animals demonstrate that the maintained oral administration of green tea polyphenols rises the minimal erythema dose and also reduces photocarcinogenicity and photoaging induced by UVB radiation.

Experimental studies on mice affected by skin cancer induced by UV radiation have shown that applying and orally consuming green tea have a certain effect in the inhibition of carcinogenicity, proved by the lowering of the DNA’s oxidative stress.

On experimentation animals, green tea polyphenols have demonstrated having photoprotective effect through different mechanisms: antioxidants, protecting cell DNA… When administered orally on experimentation animals, it reduces the development of skin tumors induced by UV radiation.

Other studies have proved that green tea polyphenols could be chemopreventive compounds, used as a strategy to reduce the risk of skin cancer induced by UV radiation in humans. On mice they have shown chemoprotective effects and apparently, they can prevent skin edema, erythema and lipid peroxidation.

See study

OyetakinWhite P, Tribout H, Baron E. Protective mechanisms of green tea polyphenols in skin. Oxid Med Cell Longev. 2012;2012:560- 82.

Green tea is one of the most popular drinks all over the world. Thousands of millions of people drink tea and numerous studies show that green tea is highly beneficial for our health. There are three main types of tea: green, black and oolong. All three types come from the leaves of the same plant, called Camellia sinesis. The difference is how the leaves are processed. Green tea is based on unfermented leaves, oolong tea comes from partially fermented leaves and black tea comes from the totally fermented ones.

Green tea contains several bioactive compounds, such as caffeine, other alkaloids, polyphenols and vitamin K. Most of its healthy properties are due to its polyphenol content. Green tea polyphenols include flavonoids and catechins, which can reduce the formation of free radicals and some other damaging structures in the body to protect cells and molecules.

Multiple studies have proved the benefits of green tea polyphenols as photoprotection against UV-induced damage. Since polyphenols can be stored in the skin, drinking green tea regularly or taking a green tea supplements could help our daily photoprotection.

The photoprotective effect of green tea can help with the reduction of erythema caused by ultraviolet radiation. Studies on animals demonstrate that the maintained oral administration of green tea polyphenols rises the minimal erythema dose and also reduces photocarcinogenicity and photoaging induced by UVB radiation.

Experimental studies on mice affected by skin cancer induced by UV radiation have shown that applying and orally consuming green tea have a certain effect in the inhibition of carcinogenicity, proved by the lowering of the DNA’s oxidative stress.

On experimentation animals, green tea polyphenols have demonstrated having photoprotective effect through different mechanisms: antioxidants, protecting cell DNA… When administered orally on experimentation animals, it reduces the development of skin tumors induced by UV radiation.

Other studies have proved that green tea polyphenols could be chemopreventive compounds, used as a strategy to reduce the risk of skin cancer induced by UV radiation in humans. On mice they have shown chemoprotective effects and apparently, they can prevent skin edema, erythema and lipid peroxidation.

Ver estudio

OyetakinWhite P, Tribout H, Baron E. Protective mechanisms of green tea polyphenols in skin. Oxid Med Cell Longev. 2012;2012:560- 82.

Vitis Vinífera

Its composition, rich in polyphenols, and its high content in proanthocyanidins confer a high antioxidant power to the grape extract.

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Vitis vinifera is also known as wine grape, European grape or grapevine. Grapes present a high polyphenols content and some other bioactives in lower quantities.

Polyphenols are a wide group of substances found in plants which have been broadly studied because of their therapeutic effects. As antioxidants, polyphenols “protect against damage caused by free radicals formed by solar exposure, contamination and stress”.

Because of the beneficial effects that are attributed to these grape compounds, numerous clinical studies have been focused on its antioxidant properties that protect our cells against damage and oxidative stress caused by sun exposure.

Several studies have showed, through different mechanisms by different methodologies, that compounds present in Vitis Vinifera have the potential to protect human melanocytes against UV light and inhibit skin damage and melanogenesis. It has also been suggested that these compounds could be useful by attenuating skin disorders anomalies caused by oxidative stress, protecting it against harmful effects of UV radiation, and reducing sunburns.

A study on mice suggests that supplementation with natural compounds of Vitis Vinifera could inhibit photocarcinogenesis in mice by the inhibition of the inflammation induced by UV-B irradiation and the inflammatory mediators in mice’s skin.

See study

Katiyar SK. Proanthocyanidins from grape seeds inhibit UV-radiation-induced immune suppression in mice: detection and analysis of molecular and cellular targets. Photochem Photobiol. 2015 Jan-Feb;91(1):156-62.

Vitis vinifera is also known as wine grape, European grape or grapevine. Grapes present a high polyphenols content and some other bioactives in lower quantities.

Polyphenols are a wide group of substances found in plants which have been broadly studied because of their therapeutic effects. As antioxidants, polyphenols “protect against damage caused by free radicals formed by solar exposure, contamination and stress”.

Because of the beneficial effects that are attributed to these grape compounds, numerous clinical studies have been focused on its antioxidant properties that protect our cells against damage and oxidative stress caused by the sun exposure.

Several studies have showed, through different mechanisms by different methodologies, that compounds present in Vitis Vinifera have the potential to protect human melanocytes against UV light and inhibit skin damage and melanogenesis. It has also been suggested that these compounds could be useful by attenuating skin disorders anomalies caused by oxidative stress, protecting it against harmful effects of UV radiation, and reducing sunburns.

A study on mice suggests that supplementation with natural compounds of Vitis Vinifera could inhibit photocarcinogenesis in mice by the inhibition of the inflammation induced by UV-B irradiation and the inflammatory mediators in mice’s skin.

See study

Katiyar SK. Proanthocyanidins from grape seeds inhibit UV-radiation-induced immune suppression in mice: detection and analysis of molecular and cellular targets. Photochem Photobiol. 2015 Jan-Feb;91(1):156-62.

Vitamin C

It is a water-soluble antioxidant that contributes to the protection of the cells against oxidative damage and helps to the proper operation of immune system.

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Vitamin C, also known as L-ascorbic acid, is an essential water-soluble vitamin. Human beings, unlike most animals, are not capable of synthesizing vitamin C endogenously, so it must be an essencial part of our diet.

Vitamin C is a key nutrient in several metabolic reactions, including collagen synthesis, a main component in the dermic layer of the skin, and it is also a normal part of the skin that can be found in high concentrations in the dermis and epidermis as well. However, aging, and an excessive exposure to UV radiation exposure or to contaminating agents (such as smoke from cigarettes or ozone) cause lower vitamin C content in the skin.

Some studies have shown that vitamin C can protect against damage caused by UVA-UVB rays, correct pigmentary problems and improve some anomalous skin conditions.

In two studies on rodents, adding vitamin C to their diet reduced the size and number of dermal neoplasm and skin tumors induced by chronic exposure to UV rays.

Several studies on humans have proven that oral supplementation with a combination of vitamin C and E increases the minimal erythema dose and diminish the blood flow induced by erythema on damaged skin areas. These results suggests that the intake of both vitamins may protect against radiation injury.

In cell culture models, vitamin C supplementation has numerous benefits fighting photodamage. Specifically, it has been proved that vitamin C rises the synthesis of collagen proteins in order to repair damaged skin, increase the proliferation rate of fibroblasts (a capacity that decreases with age) and stimulates the DNA repair in skin cells.

See study

Greul AK, Grundmann JU, Heinrich F, Pfitzner I, Bernhardt J, Ambach A, Biesalski HK, Gollnick H. Photoprotection of UV-irradiated human skin: an antioxidative combination of vitamins E and C, carotenoids, selenium and proanthocyanidins. Skin Pharmacol Appl Skin Physiol. 2002 Sep-Oct;15(5):307-15.

Vitamin C, also known as L-ascorbic acid, is an essential water-soluble vitamin. Human beings, unlike most animals, are not capable of synthesizing vitamin C endogenously, so it must be an essencialindispensable part of our diet.

Vitamin C is a key nutrient in several metabolic reactions, including collagen synthesis, a main component in the dermic layer of the skin, and it is also a normal part of the skin that can be found in high concentrations in the dermis and epidermis as well. However, aging, and an excessive exposure to UV radiation exposure or to contaminating agents (such as smoke from cigarettes or ozone) cause a lower vitamin C content in the skin.

Some studies have shown that vitamin C can protect against damage caused by UVA-UVB rays, correct pigmentary problems and improve some anomalous skin conditions.

In two studies on rodents, adding vitamin C to their diet reduced the size and number of dermal neoplasm and skin tumors induced by chronic exposure to UV rays.

Several studies on humans have proven that oral supplementation with a combination of vitamin C and E increases the minimal erythema dose and diminish the blood flow induced by erythema on damaged skin areas. These results suggests that the intake of both vitamins may protect against radiation injury.

In cell culture models, vitamin C supplementation has numerous benefits fighting photodamage. Specifically, it has been proved that vitamin C rises the synthesis of collagen proteins in order to repair damaged skin, increase the proliferation rate of fibroblasts (a capacity that decreases with age) and stimulates the DNA repair in skin cells.

See study

Greul AK, Grundmann JU, Heinrich F, Pfitzner I, Bernhardt J, Ambach A, Biesalski HK, Gollnick H. Photoprotection of UV-irradiated human skin: an antioxidative combination of vitamins E and C, carotenoids, selenium and proanthocyanidins. Skin Pharmacol Appl Skin Physiol. 2002 Sep-Oct;15(5):307-15.

Vitamin E

It is a fat-soluble antioxidant that contributes to the protection of cells against oxidative damage.

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Vitamin E is an essential fat-soluble vitamin that works as an antioxidant agent protecting fatty acids.

The term vitamin E includes 8 molecules that can be divided in two categories: tocopherols and tocotrienols. These categories are divided in alpha (α), beta (beta), gamma (γ) and delta (δ). α-tocopherol is the most studied compound but γ-tocopherols and γ-tocotrienols have also been studied due to their presence in our diet.

As an antioxidant, vitamin E mainly reacts with reactive oxygen species. Moreover, vitamin E can absorb the energy of UV light. Thus, it has a key role in photoprotection, preventing the formation of free radicals caused by UV radiation and skin damage.

Vitamin E is the most common lipophilic antioxidant in our skin. UV-light exposure and ozone reduce the content of vitamin E in our skin. The primary role of vitamin E in our skin is preventing damage caused by free radicals and reactive oxygen species.

The use of vitamin E in the prevention of UV-induced damage has been widely studied. Several studies on animals and humans have evaluated the photoprotective potential of vitamin E when orally administered.

Several studies on mice fed with α-tocopheryl acetate showed inhibition of tumors induced by UV radiation. A different research on mice detected a reduction in DNA damage caused by UV radiation with dietary α-tocopheryl acetate.

A study in humans consuming daily 400 UI of α-tocopherol showed a reduction in lipid peroxidation induced by UV radiation in the skin, but it was not observed a total photoprotection effect. In addition, several studies suggested that the combination of vitamin E and vitamin C can protect skin against UV damage and reduce DNA damage after UV exposure.

See study

Kannan S, Lim HW. Photoprotection and vitamin D: a review. Photodermatol Photoimmunol Photomed. 2014 Apr-Jun;30(2-3):137-45.

Vitamin E is an essential fat-soluble vitamin that works as an antioxidant agent protecting fatty acids.

The term vitamin E includes 8 molecules that can be divided in two categories: tocopherols and tocotrienols. These categories are divided in alpha (α), beta (beta), gamma (γ) and delta (δ). α-tocopherol is the most studied compound but γ-tocopherols and γ-tocotrienols have also been studied due to their presence in our diet.

As an antioxidant, vitamin E mainly reacts with reactive oxygen species. Moreover, vitamin E can absorb the energy of UV light. Thus, it has a key role in photoprotection, preventing the formation of free radicals caused by UV radiation and skin damage.

Vitamin E is the most common lipophilic antioxidant in our skin. UV-light exposure and ozone reduce the content of vitamin E in our skin. The primary role of vitamin E in our skin is preventing damage caused by free radicals and reactive oxygen species.

The use of vitamin E in the prevention of UV-induced damage has been widely studied. Several studies on animals and humans have evaluated the photoprotective potential of vitamin E when orally administered.

Several studies on mice fed with α-tocopheryl acetate showed inhibition of tumors induced by UV radiation. A different research on mice detected a reduction in DNA damage caused by UV radiation with dietary α-tocopheryl acetate.

A study in humans consuming daily 400 UI of α-tocopherol showed a reduction in lipid peroxidation induced by UV radiation in the skin, but it was not observed a total photoprotection effect. In addition, several studies suggested that the combination of vitamin E and vitamin C can protect skin against UV damage and reduce DNA damage after UV exposure.

See study

Kannan S, Lim HW. Photoprotection and vitamin D: a review. Photodermatol Photoimmunol Photomed. 2014 Apr-Jun;30(2-3):137-45.

Selenium

It is an essential mineral that offers a key function in the skin antioxidant system.

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Selenium is an essential mineral that increases the activity of some antioxidant enzymes whose biological function is providing protective effects against oxidative damage. More specifically, its antioxidant qualities help to prevent free radicals that can damage cellular health.

Selenium is needed for human health due to the fact that there are some enzymes, called selenoproteins, that require selenium in order to work properly. These enzymes help our body to carry out some basic physiological functions.

Selenium is an essencial component of selenoproteins playing an essential role in regular cellular activity.

Some studies suggest that selenium supplements, both oral and topical, may protect skin against several harmful effects of UVB radiation due to an increase of antioxidant proteins concentration. These proteins depend on selenium after UV rays exposure, helping to reinforce so the antioxidant defense of the skin.

Some in vitro experiments with human and animal cells have proved the efficacy of selenium in prevention of skin damage induced by solar radiation and in its potential to improving the capacity of DNA to repair damage.

Basic research has shed a light on numerous protective mechanisms which help mitigate harm caused by UVB exposure. Selenium could protect skin against UV radiation since it does rise the activity of the antioxidant enzymes, such as glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and thioredoxin reductase.

See study

Roberts RL, Green J, Lewis B. Lutein and zeaxanthin in eye and skin health. Clin Dermatol. 2009 Mar-Apr;27(2):195-201.

Selenium is an essential mineral that increases the activity of some antioxidant enzymes whose biological function is providing protective effects against oxidative damage. More specifically, its antioxidant qualities help to prevent free radicals that can damage cellular health.

Selenium is neededind for human health due to the fact that there are some enzymes, called selenoproteins, that require selenium in order to work properly. These enzymes help our body to carry out some basic physiological functions.

Selenium is an essencial component of selenoproteins playing an essential role in regular cellular activity.

Some studies suggest that selenium supplements, both oral and topical, may protect skin against several harmful effects of UVB radiation due to an increase of antioxidant proteins concentration. These proteins depend on selenium after UV rays exposure, helping to reinforce so the antioxidant defense of the skin.

Some in vitro experiments with human and animal cells have proved the efficacy of selenium in prevention of skin damage induced by solar radiation and in its potential to improving the capacity of DNA to repair damage.

Basic research has shed a light on numerous protective mechanisms which help mitigate harm caused by UVB exposure. Selenium could protect skin against UV radiation since it does rise the activity of the antioxidant enzymes, such as glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and thioredoxin reductase.

See study

Roberts RL, Green J, Lewis B. Lutein and zeaxanthin in eye and skin health. Clin Dermatol. 2009 Mar-Apr;27(2):195-201.

Lutein

It can be found at the central part of retina, which is responsible for central vision. It is an important carotenoid with an antioxidant effect.

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Lutein is a carotenoid from the group of xanthophylls. The main sources of lutein are green leafy vegetables, but it can also be found in significative amounts in broccoli, corn and peas.

Lutein is an essential component in the retina and has a clearly established role in ocular health, acting as an antioxidant and absorbing blue light.

Lutein is also present in the epidermal and dermal compartments and contributes to skin color.

Several studies aimed to investigate the relation between lutein intake and the improvement in skin health with photoprotective goals. In addition, a study evaluating 5 physiological parameters (surface lipids, hydration, photoprotective activity, skin elasticity and lipid peroxidation of the skin) after oral administration, a better protection against lipidic peroxidation and also an improvement in the photoprotective activity after UV radiation was observed.

See study

Roberts RL, Green J, Lewis B. Lutein and zeaxanthin in eye and skin health. Clin Dermatol. 2009 Mar-Apr;27(2):195-201.

Lutein is a carotenoid from the group of xanthophylls. The main sources of lutein are green leafy vegetables, but it can also be found in significative amounts in broccoli, corn and peas.

Lutein is an essential component in the retina and has a clearly established role in ocular health, acting as an antioxidant and absorbing blue light.

Lutein is also present in the epidermal and dermal compartments and contributes to skin color.

Several studies aimed to investigate the relation between lutein intake and the improvement in skin health with photoprotective goals. In addition, a study evaluating 5 physiological parameters (surface lipids, hydration, photoprotective activity, skin elasticity and lipid peroxidation of the skin) after oral administration, a better protection against lipidic peroxidation and also an improvement in the photoprotective activity after UV radiation was observed.

See study

Roberts RL, Green J, Lewis B. Lutein and zeaxanthin in eye and skin health. Clin Dermatol. 2009 Mar-Apr;27(2):195-201.

Lycopene

It is a carotene that can be found in fruits and vegetables. It presents an antioxidant effect that contributes to keeping a healthy skin.

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Lycopene is a carotene that can mainly be found in tomatoes, as well as some other fruits and red vegetables. Once it gets absorbed, lycopene flows with blood and gets mainly stored in tissue and fatty organs in our body.

Lycopene acts as antioxidant and helps to neutralize free radicals formed by chemical reactions that are happening constantly in our body.

There have been several clinical trials evaluating the effects of supplements with lycopene in protecting skin. These studies have concluded that consuming lycopene may improve the formation of erythema, reduce skin roughness and contribute to photoprotection since it does absorb UV light. Some of these studies have shown the photoprotective benefits of lycopene by itself and also combined with some other micronutrients (vitamins and minerals).

See study

Rizwan M, Rodriguez-Blanco I, Harbottle A, Birch-Machin MA, Watson RE, Rhodes LE. Tomato paste rich in lycopene protects against cutaneous photodamage in humans in vivo: a randomized controlled trial. Br J Dermatol. 2011 Jan;164(1):154-62.

Lycopene is a carotene that can mainly be found in tomatoes, as well as some other fruits and red vegetables. Once it gets absorbed, lycopene flows with blood and gets mainly stored in tissue and fatty organs in our body.

Lycopene acts as antioxidant and helps to neutralize free radicals formed by chemical reactions that are happening constantly in our body.

There have been several clinical trials evaluating the effects of supplements with lycopene in protecting skin. These studies have concluded that consuming lycopene may improve the formation of erythema, reduce skin roughness and contribute to photoprotection since it does absorb UV light. Some of these studies have shown the photoprotective benefits of lycopene by itself and also combined with some other micronutrients (vitamins and minerals).

See study

Rizwan M, Rodriguez-Blanco I, Harbottle A, Birch-Machin MA, Watson RE, Rhodes LE. Tomato paste rich in lycopene protects against cutaneous photodamage in humans in vivo: a randomized controlled trial. Br J Dermatol. 2011 Jan;164(1):154-62.

Betacarotene

It is a natural precursor of vitamin A which helps skin with its normal functions.

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Beta-carotene is a carotene part of the carotenoid group. It is a fat-soluble antioxidant, just like the other carotenoids, and inhibits the oxidation of molecules and protects the body against free radicals.

Beta-carotene is transformed into vitamin A in the body. This vitamin can work as an antioxidant, protecting cells against oxidative damage. Beta-carotene by itself it is not an essential nutrient, but vitamin A is.

Several studies point out beta-carotene as a photoprotective agent because it might inhibit photochemical reactions induced by UV exposure in the skin, which cause free radicals.

After ingesting beta-carotene, this component gets absorbed in the blood flow and gets distributed to several organs all over the body, including skin.

Some other studies have show that a high intake of carotenoids rises the endogenous level of UV photoprotection, reducing sensitivity against erythemas induced by UV rays. In addition, it has been observed that a prolonged consumption of beta-carotene could help protect skin against sunburn and improve redness caused by UV radiation.

See study

(OyetakinWhite P, Tribout H, Baron E. Protective mechanisms of green tea polyphenols in skin. Oxid Med Cell Longev. 2012;2012:560- 82.)

Beta-carotene is a carotene part of the carotenoid group. It is a fat-soluble antioxidant, just like the other carotenoids, and inhibits the oxidation of molecules and protects the body against free radicals.

Beta-carotene is transformed into vitamin A in the body. This vitamin can work as an antioxidant, protecting cells against oxidative damage. Beta-carotene by itself it is not an essential nutrient, but vitamin A is.

Several studies point out beta-carotene as a photoprotective agent because it might inhibit photochemical reactions induced by UV exposure in the skin, which cause free radicals.

After ingesting beta-carotene, this component gets absorbed in the blood flow and gets distributed to several organs all over the body, including skin.

Some other studies have show that a high intake of carotenoids rises the endogenous level of UV photoprotection, reducing sensitivity against erythemas induced by UV rays. In addition, it has been observed that a prolonged consumption of beta-carotene could help protect skin against sunburn and improve redness caused by UV radiation.

See study

(OyetakinWhite P, Tribout H, Baron E. Protective mechanisms of green tea polyphenols in skin. Oxid Med Cell Longev. 2012;2012:560- 82.)

Vitamin D

It is a fat-soluble nutrient that contributes to the normal operation of immune system.

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Vitamin D is an essential fat-soluble vitamin indispensable for calcium absorption and bone development, growth of cells and the normal operation of immune system.

Solar exposure is our main source of vitamin D since UVB radiation coming from the sun stimulates vitamin D at the epidermis. However, there are dietary sources of vitamin D such as fish and eggs. Supplementing our diet with vitamin D is linked to a wide range of benefits.

In addition, during a prolonged solar exposure it is highly recommended consuming food rich in vitamin D or vitamin D supplements in order to keep balanced serum levels.

Some studies, mainly in vitro and studies on mice, have shown that vitamin D can offer photoprotective effects.

See study

(Kannan S, Lim HW. Photoprotection and vitamin D: a review. Photodermatol Photoimmunol Photomed. 2014 Apr-Jun;30(2-3):137-45.)

Vitamin D is an essential fat-soluble vitamin indispensable for calcium absorption and bone development, growth of cells and the normal operation of immune system.

Solar exposure is our main source of vitamin D since UVB radiation coming from the sun stimulates vitamin D at the epidermis. However, there are dietary sources of vitamin D such as fish and eggs. Supplementing our diet with vitamin D is linked to a wide range of benefits.

In addition, during a prolonged solar exposure it is highly recommended consuming food rich in vitamin D or vitamin D supplements in order to keep balanced serum levels.

Some studies, mainly in vitro and studies on mice, have shown that vitamin D can offer photoprotective effects.

See study

(Kannan S, Lim HW. Photoprotection and vitamin D: a review. Photodermatol Photoimmunol Photomed. 2014 Apr-Jun;30(2-3):137-45.)

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